Popular Paver Patterns

All block paving for trafficked areas, such as driveways, should be laid in a fully interlocked pattern. The most popular such patterns are 45° or 90° Herringbone patterns. On this page, diagrams will be used to show how to set up such patterns.

90 Degree Herringbone Pattern

90 Degree Herringbone

90 Degree Herringbone

This is the simpler of the herringbone patterns to set up. Decide on a “base-line” that will be the start of the pattern. This is usually taken to be a line along the main direction of travel or one that is parallel or at right angles to the house or other building. If there is a right-angle corner, the setting out can be based on the two lines, as shown in the diagram below.

On a square or rectangular area, a 90° herringbone pattern can be used to keep cutting to a minimum. Only one block width in 4 need be cut to fit, and judicious positioning of edge courses can ensure that the pavement is a given number of full bricks wide. It is best to start laying tight against a fixed edge, such as against an edging course, but if this is not possible, and then a taut string line can be established as the base-line.

45 Degree Herringbone Pattern

This pattern is identical to the pattern above, except that it has been rotated through 45°. It can be set out exactly as shown above, by establishing the base-line at 45° and laying the blocks square to this line. Alternatively, a base-line can be set up square to the work, and the blocks laid at 45° to this line. This second method may at first seem complicated, but is particularly valuable for ensuring that the alignment is not drifting out of true with subsequent courses of blocks.

Longitudinal 45 Degree Herringbone

Longitudinal 45 Degree Herringbone

Transverse 45 Degree Herringbone

Transverse 45 Degree Herringbone

 

When establishing this pattern, the best visual effect is achieved by laying the blocks in such a manner that the “chevrons” run along the principal direction of traffic or along the length of the driveway (longitudinal), rather than across (transverse).

 

Brandon Chatham

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